Living On A Liner

The liner has become the new fashionable place to be this year. It’s easy to see how the appeal of a holiday on a grand liner can translate into the desire for everyday liner luxury living. The ocean liner evokes images of grand design, luxury lifestyle and the exhilarating freshness of sea breezes. Indeed, the Queen was in Southampton only this month to name the rather magnificent new P&O cruise liner, The Britannia

Britannia

The Britannia

Tom Dixon has just masterminded the new interiors of the Mondrian Hotel London located within Sea Containers House and opening this summer. This former 1970s hotel has been given a new lease of life with decor and design conjuring up images of sailing on a gigantic 1920s cruise liner. Even the roof has been remodelled to echo the lines of a grand ship. The ocean liner was a defining influence on the 1920s and 1930s art deco and modernist architects of the period. 

Mondrian_Cover_Image

The ocean liner has also had a defining influence on the shape and architectural character of homes in coastal Poole, Dorset. A J Seal, the 1930s creator of the significant modernist buildings Harbour Court (below) nearby Conning Tower and FJB’s Harbour Heights Hotel is one of the area’s most celebrated local architects – these homes were also mentioned by Pevsner as ‘a brave and enterprising group of Early Modern buildings.’

Harbour Court echoes the shape of a grand 1920s liner with its flat roof, roof-top sun lounge and ‘stern deck-like’ balconies.

Harbour Court 6b

Berkeleys has just let the second floor apartment in Harbour Court. With sea glimpses, an expansive terrace for alfresco summer dining and close proximity to Sandbanks beaches, this is an ideal home for those searching for a long summer rental and regular weekend escapes to the coast. Priced at £1,295 per month (fee apply) it is probably a more affordable way to live in the spirit of a luxury cruise liner, and it can last a lot longer too.

Harbour Court 10